Is Your Shia Friend Asking You Questions?

Replies to Questions by Shias and a review of their beliefs

Shias and its sects

Posted by answersforshiafriend on September 26, 2011

SHIITES AND SHIAISM

Shiaism (The Rafidah) and Islam are indeed different religions. This sect has developed into what we now know as the Shia whose beliefs and thoughts are repugnant beyond belief. The divergence of Shiaism from Islaam can be summarized from the books which they consider most authentic, and the statements of their most respected scholars. Some of the proofs are available on this page Most of the Muslim UMMAH and Western scholars have very little genuine and reliable knowledge of SHIA beliefs and practices. However, most of the openly declared SHIA beliefs revolve around The Concept of Imamah, the superiority of Ali (May Allah be pleased with him), and the so-called love of the Prophet’s family members. As a result, the intense love that Sunni Muslims carry for the Prophet’s family members combined with the magnanimous personality of Ali has led some Sunnis to accept Shia’s as part of the Muslim UMMAH.

However, the brutal fact remains that under the pretense of Ali’s Superiority and the so-called love of the Prophet’s family members, Shias have literally evolved an entirely new religion, grossly distorted the teachings of the Holy Qur’ân, and completely rejected the sanctity and authenticity of the Hadeeth.

They have elevated the sayings of their imams to the level of the Prophet’s sayings and have classified them as Hadeeth. For all practical purposes, they reject the most authentic sayings of the Prophet (Peace be upon him) and Base their religion on the so-called Hadeeth attributed to their Imaams. By doing so they have rejected one of the most fundamental principles of Islam: The law can only be derived from the sayings and actions of the Prophet (Peace be upon him), not any other human being.

The Saba’iyyah, a sect of the Rawafid, emerged in the time of `Ali and told `Ali he was God. `Ali (may Allah be pleased with him) burned some of them to death as a result. Later, the Rawafid split into many groups like: The Zaydis, Imamis, Kaysaniyyas, Qaddahiyyas  and Exaggerators (Ghullat). Some people asked Imam Zayd ibn `Ali to disavow Abu Bakr and `Umar. He would not do so, and some people refused his decision, and deserted him, thereby becoming known as Rawafid, which means : the Refusers, the Rejecters. Those who stayed with him became known as the Zaydis, and so they are technically not of the Rawafid. The exaggerators are not Muslims, these Raafidi (Shia) actually descend from Abu Lu’luah Majoosi (a Persian fire worshipper) and Abdullaah ibn Saba’ (a Jew). However they are more dangerous from the Christians themselves. Christians fight Islaam face to face (if they did) while Rafidiyah stab Islam from its back they have lot of Absurdities in their beliefs like Badah, Rajah, Mutah, Taqiyyah, etc

The Zaydis, Imamis and exaggerators split up further, with each group accusing the other of kufr. The Zaydis split into three groups: Jarudis, Sulaymanis and Butris. They all agreed on the leadership of Imam Zayd ibn `Ali ibn al-Husayn when he revolted at the time of Hisham ibn `Abdul-Malik. They are the closest of the Shiah to Ahlus-Sunnah; they merely maintain that `Ali had more right to the Caliphate, but they do not claim that he was explicitly appointed as Caliph by the Prophet (may Allah bless him and his Household and grant them peace), and hence they accept the Caliphates of Abu Bakr, `Umar and `Uthman. The Kisanis split into two groups: one claimed that Muhammad ibn Hanafiyyah, a son of `Ali, is still alive and that he is the Mahdi; the other group say he died and passed on the leadership.

The Imamis and exaggerators split into fifteen groups, among which are the Ja`faris/Ithna `Asharis (Twelvers) and the Isma`ilis. The exaggerators claimed divinity for their Imams, permitted all sorts of haram things, and in short dismissed the obligations of shari`ah.

The Seveners or Isma’ilis, like all Shiites, believe that the descendants of Muhammad, through his daughter Fatima and her husband Ali the fourth Caliph, are the rightful rulers of the Muslim world.  Thus the descendants of Ali are considered infallible and as divinely guided as Muhammad himself. This sect derives its name from Isma’il, the eldest son of the sixth Imam, Jafar as-Sadiq. In 762 CE, Isma’il died before his father, which resulted in bitter disputes of succession. The minority of Shiites regarded the old line of Imams extinct and chose Isma’il’s eldest son as the new Imam. Thus they proclaimed a cycle of seven Imams, Ali being the first and Isma’il the seventh, and thus the seventh Imam after his line of Imams would be the Mahdi, or Messiah, or the seventh after him, etc..

The Isma’ilis have usually been small in numbers, but well organised and disciplined.  Soon they developed into a cult, borrowing various ideas from Jewish mysticism, Greek philosophy, Babylonian astrology, Christian Gnosticism, etc.., When secular sciences were being employed in the Abbasid Empire, the Isma’ilis were thriving, and managed to recruit a large number of followers, who formed a well organised guerrilla army. By combining their scholarly skills and extraordinary underground network of spies, the Isma’ilis established their anti-Caliph inEgyptduring the 10th century. They named his dynasty after Muhammad’s daughter, and thus the name Fatimids emerged. In reality they are the dynasty of a Jew called Abdullah bin Qaddah, and that was they were called Abidi too. TheAbidiStateinEgyptquickly expanded and soon the Isma’ilis controlled westernSyriaand a large part ofNorth Africa, killing thousands of Muslims. They also built a new capital, Fustat, near the ancient Pyramids, which in a few centuries grew to be the largest city in the Muslim world, under the name ofCairo.

When the Abidi dynasty was destroyed by the Abbasids, the Isma’ilis split into two sub-sects, Tayibiya and Niziriya, named after two Abidi princes. The former sect was soon transformed into a esoteric cult, which moved its activities underground and became invisible. The Niziriya sect transformed itself back into the pre-Abidi Isma’ilism, developing a network of agents and spies all over the Muslim world. The best known organization within the Niziriya was probably the drug-abusing Assassin sect, notorious for assassinations all over the Muslim world. Today, however, the Niziriya sect has turned pacifist and increasingly Westernized.

Out of the Assassin stronghold inSyria, two heterodox sub-sects have survived, the Alawite and the Druze. The Alawite sect is militant and combines radical theories from both Isma’il and Ithna Shia. The Druzes, on the other hand, have until more recently been more pacifistic, waiting for the return of their Mahdi, the psychotic Abidi Caliph al-Hakim, who ‘disappeared’ when he burned down his capital around 1000 CE.  In the 13th century the Druzes closed their sect, and became a distinct tribe or nation. They serve today in the Israeli army against Palestinian Muslims.

The largest sect within Shia is the Ithna or Twelver, which follows the original line of Imams. When the Seveners chose the son of Isma’il to become the Imam, the majority of Shiites chose Isma’ils younger brother, Muza al-Kazim, as the seventh Imam. The Ithna adopt their ‘Twelver’ name from their belief in the twelfth Imam, Muhammad ibn al-Askari, who ‘disappeared’ one day and thus became the hidden Mahdi who would return to earth at the end of days. The ‘Twelvers’ worship their Imams, sometimes as the incarnation of Ali or Hussain. They form the vast majority of Shiites, including most Iranians and almost 50% of the Iraqi nation.

The third largest body in Shia is the Zaydi sect or the Fivers, prevailing inYemenand among some Bedouin tribes in Saudi-Arabia. The Zaydi sect is more or less the deification of the 7th century Arabian culture, and it fiercely denounces the semi-divinity of Imams, contrary to the Twelver. Their founder was the fifth Imam, Zayd ibn Abidin, who was a rationalist and thus denounced his alleged divinity. The Zaydi Imams are more like Bedouin sheikhs than divine authorities, and thus reject hereditary leadership, and are only visible during warfare.

There are said to be more than 70 small Shia sects all around the world. Probably the best example of these was the Bahai sect, which has been persecuted and refuted as anti-Islamic, but grows fast as a separate religion, basing its doctrines on ‘world peace and harmony’ and the unity of all religions. The center of the Bahai sect is inIsrael!

 

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